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Ursula Lauderdale Papers

  • US TxSaT UA 06-03-04
  • Collection
  • 1870s-1940s

This collection contains material from Ursula Lauderdale, a Texas artist and former art instructor at Trinity University. It includes a small scrapbook, photographs, correspondence, documents, and news clippings. The scrapbook, clippings, membership cards, and many of the photographs help to illustrate her work as an artist during the early 20th century.

Lauderdale, Ursula Hall (1872-1968)

Rev. William M. Kelly, M.D., Papers

  • US TxSaT SC.016
  • Collection
  • 1924-2005 (bulk 1924-1935)

The Rev. William M. Kelly, M.D., Papers consist primarily of typed copies of correspondence between Dr. Samuel Lee Hornbeak, President of Trinity University, and William Kelly, a Trinity alumnus and medical missionary in China. The correspondence is concerned with discussions of Chinese artifacts, accounts of Chinese history and customs, and descriptions of Dr. Kelly's journeys in China. There is some correspondence between Kelly and other Trinity affiliates, as well as between Hornbeak and other Chinese missionaries. The collection also contains later correspondence and inventories regarding the Chinese artifacts given to Trinity by Rev. Kelly, and genealogical research conducted by Kelly's grandson, Brooks Kelly.

Kelly, William M., 1874-1957

Marion Oettinger Collection of Fieldnotes

  • US TxSaT SC.008
  • Collection
  • 1945-2016, undated

Collection of fieldnotes compiled by Dr. Marion Oettinger while conducting anthropological fieldwork in Mexico, primarily in the 1970s. Oettinger's research focused on lienzos. A lienzo, from the Spanish word for "canvas," is a sheet of cloth painted with indigenous Mesoamerican pictorial writing. This collection includes fieldnotes on nine lienzos: the Lienzos of Chalchihuapan, Malinaltepec, Petlacala, San Gabriel Etla, San Juan Cuautla, Santiago Atitlan, Santo Domingo Barrio Alto, Xochiaca, and Xoxocatlan. The fieldnotes include photographs, slides, negatives, and transparencies; photocopies from printed works and government documents; typed and handwritten notes; manuscript drafts; maps; and correspondence.

Oettinger, Marion, Jr., 1942-

Ziperman Postcard Collection

  • US TxSaT SC.005
  • Collection
  • ca. 1890-2010

Postcards have long been popular as an inexpensive way to communicate with loved ones, commemorate travel, or see world landmarks without leaving home.

The earliest known post card was printed in England in 1870; in the early years, most post cards were issued by government postal agencies. It wasn't until the United States Congress passed the Private Mailing Card Act in 1898--allowing private publishers to print postcards, which would then have a stamp affixed for mailing--that postcards entered the mainstream as a popular means of communication. Initially, consumers were only permitted to write an address on the back of a postcard; it was not until 1907 that "divided back" postcards were authorized by the United States Post Office.

The period between 1898 and 1918 is considered the "Golden Age of Postcards." Most postcards were manufactured by high quality printers in Germany and Austria; World War I shifted the production of many cards to the United States, where quality diminished.

Deltiology is the collecting and study of postcards, and has been a popular past-time since their inception. Margaret "Peg" Ziperman collected postcards throughout her life, both to document her travels and postcards of places she had never been. She was a longtime resident and active community member in San Antonio. Mrs. Ziperman continued to add postcards to the library's collection until her death in 2017 at the age of 102.

Ziperman, Margaret "Peg", 1915-2017