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Wilmot Proviso Circulars

  • US TxSaT SC.003
  • Colección
  • 1847-1911

Collection of circulars, pamphlets, speeches, and other ephemera related to the Wilmot Proviso. The Wilmot Proviso was introduced in the United States House of Representatives on August 8, 1846 by Congressman David Wilmot as a provision of an appropriations bill. The proviso sought to ban slavery in any territory acquired from Mexico as a result of the Mexican-American War. The bill passed in the House but failed in the Senate. Although it did not pass into law, the Wilmot Proviso is credited with intensifying the slavery debate in the years leading up to the Civil War.

Trinity University Colecciones Especiales y Archivos

Bill of Sale (Tom)

Bill of sale for an enslaved person, named Tom, sold by Joseph Megginson to Jeremiah Smith in Galveston, Texas.

Retrieve Plantation Contract

Contracts between James Hamilton, Elizabeth Hamilton, and Abner Jackson regarding the Retrieve Plantation on Oyster Creek in Brazoria County, which was owned by the Hamiltons and Jackson.

Maud Boyce Farrar memoirs

"The Saga of Our Ancestry: Being a Series of Sketches o the Lives of Pioneer Texans, Written for the Information and Pleasure of their Descendants by Maud Boyce Farrar, Waxahachie, Texas, 1934."

Contents:

  1. Rebecca Horton Boyce
  2. Mahaly, the slave woman
  3. Little Dog Penny
  4. The Aldredge Family
  5. Elizabeth Aldredge Boyce
  6. W.A. Boyce
  7. Nancy Owen Smith
  8. Hans Smith
  9. Lelia Smith Farrar
  10. Education of Her Children
  11. S.B. Farrar
  12. Genealogical Tables

Texas Slavery Documents

Two documents related to slavery in Texas, mounted onto a piece of cardstock. The first is an 1860 contract for the lease of an enslaved boy named William in La Grange, Texas. The contract is signed by M.H. Hall, R. L. Breeding, and Joseph H. Eaves; the enslaver of William is D.K. Pope.

The second document is an 1867 contract between James Frazor and Sally Frazor, laying out terms for Sally to be employed by James as a domestic laborer. Based on the date, description of the labor and remuneration, names, and Sally's illiteracy, it is likely that Sally was formerly enslaved by James.